Sunday, 12 October 2008

Turning the polls around

. Stephen Tall has an interesting piece on Liberal Democrat Voice. Stephen argues that the recent polling trends for the party are 'not good'. He does rightly say that the polls are in a state of flux at the moment but I think we can pick up on a theme. This theme is not good for us; it shows that the Conservative lead is still strong but Labour's support is stabilising. Seemingly this is in the heartland seats and this is bad news; it is in the seats we are targeting at the next election. I think Brown has played the right tune for Labour's core supporters; although Cameron has tried to sound hostile to 'greedy bankers' it really does not rub coming for a Conservative to your average Labour voter.

Stephen thinks we may well feel hard done by given Vince Cables prescience in predicting this crisis but to be honest no prizes go to the person that told you so even if they were right. People want solutions and it is those that matter; more than solutions people do want a proven track record or at least a solid alternative. Since we are not seen as a credible party of government it is unlikely we will win ground even on the latter score.

He prises the performance of Nick Clegg at last weeks PMQ's which i criticised. Why?? Because despite the numerous efforts made by Nick and mentioned by Stephen none of them have helped us in the polls. This is not surprising when we wrongly offer this government 'wholehearted support'; we are a party of opposition and nobody wants to hear the governments line parroted a thousand times. If we want some attention and support for what we say then being bold and yes, maybe a little less consensual, will flag those solutions up and start a public debate which we can lead.

Following on from PMQ's; Nick sent a letter which was much more constructively critical of Brown and actually seemed like we were interested in holding the government to account which I flagged up on this blog. Why was none of this brought up at PMQ's?? Granted Nick has little time but I would imagine 99.9% of people zoned out when he offered Brown 'wholehearted support'. We can either accept there is little we can do to make a difference and that at the next election we will most likely be badly, and I mean very badly, squeezed or we have to recognise that tacking against the prevailing political wind is sometimes the way to go and make the impact that we should be doing.

2 comments:

Anonymous said...

People don't like the Labour government much but many, who are old enough to remember, fear a return to the misery of the eighties even more. Remember the high unemployement, high inflation and high interest rates? Better to stick with what you know when times are looking bad and a recession is looming - even if what you know is Gordon Brown! Any party talking of tax cuts and public service savings in this environment reminds people of the hated eighties still more. Low paid people, many of whom work in the public sector and would expect to be first out the door in any round of "efficiency savings", are put in fear for their jobs. Why should they take the risk of voting for a party that reminds them of Thatcher?

Darrell G said...

This line of attack might work for Labour against the Tories amoung its heartland...

Again you might be right with regard to the tax cuts as I have just said over on Alix Mortimer's blog...